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Supermicro GS50-000R – a “gaming” chassis

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Supermicro GS50-000R – a “gaming” chassis

Postby LongRunner » March 23rd, 2017, 7:25 am

http://www.hardwareinsights.com/supe ... g-chassis/

I've posted this one with a few of the technical details "as-is" (correction not attempted) because it's already overdue. A few remarks will come shortly.
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Re: Supermicro GS50-000R – a “gaming” chassis

Postby LongRunner » March 24th, 2017, 9:55 am

Regarding the front fan grille:
Behemot (in the review) wrote:The front grill can be removed from the case, and quite frankly, I see no reason why it is actually here. Unlike with the rear fan it has no reason to have it here, there is the front panel so it's not like you can stick anything into the fans.

It'll be for RFI shielding, although they could probably have made the holes larger to reduce the impact on airflow. To be fair, countless enthusiast-oriented cases cheerfully leave big electromagnetic "gaping holes" with their windows, although a handful were sold (years ago anyway) with a metal panel directly behind the window, so that they could comply with the regulations that way (example here).

Those "Naidec" fans do look suspiciously like an attempt to invoke the reputation of Nidec there, too (even if the design itself isn't a direct knock-off). And so far as I know, 30,000 hours at 40°C isn't actually anything special either. At least a few other manufacturers (Superred/Cheng Home Electronic and Protechnic, from memory) have also used sealed but otherwise ordinary sleeve bearings, if I recall correctly.

And while I'm familiar enough with the fan connectors themselves, I had no idea they were called "mini-DMI". :huh: (I know of mini-DIN, but that's a totally different thing, best known in its 4-pin version for S-Video and in the 6-pin version for PS/2 keyboard and mouse ports.)
Authoritarianism is for wimps.

Smart people don't buy "smart" devices without very carefully weighing up the risks and benefits beforehand.

My PC: Core i3 4130 on GA-H87M-D3H with GT640 OC 2GiB and 2 * 8GiB Kingston HyperX 1600MHz, 2 * WD3003FZEX-00Z4SA0, Pioneer BDR-209DBKS, Seasonic G-360, Chenbro PC31031, Windows 7 Pro (though I do want to build a second system with GNU/Linux).
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Re: Supermicro GS50-000R – a “gaming” chassis

Postby Behemot » April 2nd, 2017, 3:09 am

Not sure where it comes from, but I've seen it called DMI in few places, so I've adopted it :D Maybe it is not mini, it's just DMI :D

As for RFI, anybody cares about that with cases? It's like dealing with RFI for graphics cards one-two decades ago when everybody put those poor quality filters on analog video outputs. Made sense when every single CRT back in those days radiated about 100000times more RFI than thevideo signal could ever achieve :group: OFC removing that crap always increased signal quality = image sharpness.

Modern HW works on still higher frequencies, but the signals are getting weaker as everything is smaller, including voltages and power which average computer moves through itself. I don't really think this is a problem at all.
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